About your Search

20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, clinton, and the first george bush, moved away from a position no additional taxes. they all added revenues to deficit reduction. a significant amount of revenue. >> your colleague from georgia just this week said the following about that pledge not to raise any taxes. >> you know, that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly.Ñi and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> it is my view that the issue of taxes is the number one stumbling block to any kind of fiscal deal. that has to be resolved first before you can get to issues like sequestration. when you hear that from a colleague, does it say to you that there is room, and does the president do anything short of raising tax rates on the wealthy? is there anything short of that acceptable? >> well, you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. >> those have to go up? >> they have to go up. there's ways of doing that. secondly, though, we've got to close some significant loopholes. for instance, the ones which
norquist's anti-tax pledge. saying they're open to letting revenues rise if democrats do their part in the budget talks. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. we're not going to attack japan today. the world has changed, and the economic situation is different. >> so peter king is telling us, mike barnicle, not only is he going soft on taxes, he's going soft on japan. >> i know. >> it's not just peter king on the taxes. it's a big step, don't you think? >> it's a big step. >> grover. yeah, grover's taking a big hit since the election. there's no doubt about it. i think john, you'd verify this. number of republicans, i've talked to a couple of united states senators who
the people and not to him, that's what he's known for. >> his power comes from this tax pledge. the last thing that he can afford to see more republicans peel off. if they do, then he can't get the next person to sign that pledge. >> tomorrow on "starting point" we're going to be talking to race car driver danica patrick and star of "pretty little liars." cnn newsroom with carols can to casse tell low begins now. >>> horror in bangladesh. two giant clothing factories there go up in flames. they might have made the clothes that are in your closet right now. thousands of workers protest the deaths of their colleagues. were safety warnings ignored? >>> republican rebellion? lindsey graham the latest lawmaker to buck a powerful gop lobbyist and his anti-tax pledge. we'll have the view from the edge of the so-called fiscal cliff. >>> one of the most recognizable voices in hollywood lends his voice to a pro-same-sex marriage ad. >> freedom, justice and human dignity have always guided our journey toward a more perfect union. now across our country, we are standing together for the ri
over raising taxes? a decade's long pledge? >> now you see a little wiggle room. everyone, came out strong. now getting done to nitty-gritty of compromise here. perhaps backtracking here. get something done. look for language difference between tax rates and tax revenue as the debate moves forward there. >>> also this morning, the promises made to students by private for-profit colleges. did recruiters know and bend the truth about the job market to lure students to sign up for classes? a lot of reporting in recent years about what is going on with for-profit colleges. some of it kind of scary. we'll delve into that. >> we'll hear more in the next half hour. >>> later, the legendary rolling stones begin their concert tour, celebrating 50-year search for rock 'n' roll satisfaction. the first of five concerts. >> i could watch mick jagger dance all day. i think that's poetry in motion when mick gets on the stage and he's prancing around there. you can't beat that. that's americana at its best. >> better moves. rob nelson? mick jagger? >> no one's in mick's league. >>> but first, retai
a break the no tax pledge. that is a hopeful sign, folks, because a new cnn/orc poll shows more than two thirds of americans believe a trip over that cliff would create major problems, perhaps even a crisis. cnn political editor paul steinhauser is live from washington, d.c. this morning. nice to see you, paul. so the fiscal cliff triggers back-breaking tax hikes and massive spending cuts. you've got more numbers that show what type of budget plan americans actually prefer. >> exactly. one of the big arguments, zoraida, is should it be all spending cuts to get us there or tax increases, as well? brand-new numbers just out from cnn/orc. only about one in three say whatever deal should be struck should be just spending cuts. but almost seven in ten, two thirds of americans say the plan should include spending cuts and tax increases. our poll indicates americans are not so optimistic a deal will get done and if it doesn't get done, who gets the blame? look at this right here, about 45% say republicans in congress will be blamed if there is no deal and the country falls off the fiscal cliff.
not reach a deal your taxes could rise and sharp spending cuts would go into effect as well possibly triggering a recession. chuck todd is nbc's political director and chief white house correspondent. chuck, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> the goal here is to get a deal that reduces the deficit, and the battle lines have been pretty clear right now. the president campaigned rolling back the tax breaks for the highest earnings and republicans argued spending cuts are the way to get the deficit under control. are we starting to see a softening of those positions on both sides? >> reporter: here's what there's agreement on. both sides, both parties agree that the wealthiest have to pay more, and the question now and the sticking point at this stage is how do you go about making the wealthiest pay more? do you do it by raising the tax rates? that's what president obama wants to do. wants to raise the tax freights 35% where they are now up to where they were during the clinton years at 39% what. republicans are arguing is you don't have to do that. you can get all of th
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)